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Rust treatment

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Old 30-10-16, 05:08 AM
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Default Rust treatment

I have used many different products to treat surface rust and rust pitting, prior to painting, but I can't really point to a product that I know for certain is better than anything else.

Can anyone recommend any products, preferably based on experience over time - meaning a product that you have used to treat rust with long term success.
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Old 30-10-16, 05:21 PM
geo geo is offline
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Kevin,

Oh that there was a straightforward answer to this perennial problem! The one that I have used in the past to some effect is Jenolite (the watery remover not the converter), multiple applications with a bit of encouragement from a pad of wire wool seems to do the trick.

It depends upon the severity of course, but to my mind, there is nothing better than blasting the rust with an appropriate grit, then sloshing the Jenolite over the results until all signs of the rust have disappeared.

I am less keen on the converters that claim to seal the rust. On a couple of experiments I made they seemed to work, but when flexing the test pieces a week or so afterwards, there was an unhealthy amount of rust that had been sealed under the black coatings.

If you can get hold of some phosphoric acid of a decent strength, then this is a very much cheaper way of buying the basic ingredients of most of these products.

A link to one of the 'Practical Classics' tests is
http://www.rust.co.uk/filestore/Prac...erter_Test.pdf
but I did not see the follow-up, which of course is the vital part of any test.
Good luck
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Old 01-11-16, 05:01 AM
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Thanks George. I know what you mean about the rust converter. It's amazing that it's so popular. Probably down to good marketing of a quick fix!

The rust in question is nothing serious, just surface with a small amount if pitting, but it's not feasible to sand blast it.

I believe I do have a small amount of phosphoric acid in the form of Deoxidine 624 (in a jar somewhere!), however I'm aware that if you don't clean the area well enough after applying it then it may keep eating away, and one area I need to treat is a lap joint in a wing bay. Also deoxidine is not a sealant or protector, so the treated area needs to be painted promptly - they recommend within 4 hours!

It's a matter of deciding which is the worse of two evils!
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Old 06-11-16, 01:33 AM
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Kevin,
I have used lots of paint, converters and waxes over the years and have come to the conclusion that of the treatments available now POR15 is the best by far.
In areas such as wheel arches subject to abrasion it needs like most paints an annual check and touch up at least in our climate, but away from that in areas such as boot floors spare wheel wells etc it is very hard wearing and water resistant. Overcoated with Dinatrol wax and you have a very effective rust control system.
Having said that in your location either the paint or the wax on their own should halt any corrosion.
There was another paint treatment as called corroless or something similar available from Eastwood which was very good if not better, but now this at least in the UK is difficult to find but is I believe re branded still available from suppliers to the offshore oil industry.
Geoff.
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Old 06-11-16, 07:14 PM
geo geo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin H View Post
one area I need to treat is a lap joint in a wing bay.
Kevin,

Have you thought of using Fluid Film? It is fantastic at penetrating joints and the like. It is interesting to inject this into a box section and notice quite how much of it flows out through apparently sealed joints in a way that other forms of such gloop do not.

The disadvantage is that areas you treat require re-treating every year or two as it does dry out. It is not intended for use where it will be abraded with road detritus,however, it re-envigorates such products as Dinatrol (which does not protect once is has dried out).

George
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