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8 & 10 cyl Bristol cars Type 407 onwards - restoration, repair, maintenance etc

408 Engine Question

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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 15-05-15, 09:51 PM
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Thanks Bryn.
I will send a photo when complete.
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 16-05-15, 01:47 PM
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I look forward to seeing it.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 17-05-15, 08:25 PM
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Engine enamels made by a firm called PPR include a Chrysler blue I believe and are a first class product. Great glossy finish, spray or brush. I think they are a USA product, but appear to be distributed worldwide. About A$70 for 450-500ml.
Mike O
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 17-05-15, 08:30 PM
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Chrysler Blue is a completely different colour, and obviously blue. Whether you'd call the Chrysler Green/Alpine Green either blue or green seems to be a subjective thing, but robin's egg is what I would call it. It isn't Chrysler Blue though.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-15, 05:59 PM
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Default Years 318 poly was used in US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryn Tirion View Post
This is old, but I think worth a bit more input. I have always understood that since the Bristol factory was always willing to upgrade your V8 Bristol at a price, there is no penalty in value (or in exhibition) so long as you do something that they would have done. So putting in a later Torqueflite is fine, and putting in a 383 (for instance) would be fine. A 340 would not have been an option, as it was never fitted to Bristols, and is indeed a lumpy street engine and not a smooth cruising Bristol engine. I happen to think the 313 is a fine engine, developing 250 bhp at 4400 rpm stock from Plymouth Canada. They can be sourced easily in Canada, having been put in Plymouth Belvederes and Dodge Senecas among others, and even in combine harvesters (my neighbour has one in a Massey Harris combine). They could easily be booted up slightly to a 318, but keep in mind that this is an A engine and not an LA, as pointed out by others, so one has to be careful about the 318 parts and what hey are intended to fit. The 318 version of the A engine was put in a number of US market models also, between about 1958 and 1962.
Actually, the 313 and 318 A-series poly engines are essentially the same, save for a slightly larger bore on the 318. There was even a 326 version in 1959 only, and only in Dodges (this had hydraulic lifters vs. the mechanical lifters in ALL other A-series polysphere engines.

The 318 is most common and was in fact offered from 1957 through 1966 in the US and 1967 in Canada. They're easy and cheap to find and buy. And except for the pistons and pushrods, the bottom end is the same as later LA wedge-head 318s (1967 and up for US). Upgrades? The 318 A poly engine is strong to start with, including forged cranks and connecting rods. 1957-58 versions came with two four-barrel carbs and 290 hp; those dual-quad manifolds are plentiful on ebay. So are aftermarket aluminum four-barrel manifolds. HOWEVER, you're better off using an original cast-iron 4-barrel manifold, which is dual-plane for better low-end torque. There were even old Edebrock and Weiand triple two-barrel manifolds--a great option--though they're much rarer.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-15, 06:05 PM
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Default Quick corrections

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryn Tirion View Post
I would happily place a wanted ad for you up here. I see you are in Massachusetts, I am located in Alberta.

If you want to find a 318 poly engine in the US, you should look for it in models that used the Carter AFB carburettor, to get the same level of performance. These cars would include the 1960 to 1962 Dodge Dart, including submodels Phoenix, Pioneer and Seneca, although the first of these is most likely to have that option. 1958 to 1960 DeSotos also had the 318 four barrel as an option. I don't have details on later models, but certainly up to 1967 these engines were still current in several models, and found in the Fury among others, and only replaced by the LA in all Chrysler divisions in 1967, although the LA was introduced in in 1964. Most of these poly engines have long since been replaced with something very like your 340.

PS. I have found one 318 in Las Vegas and one in San Jose. PM me if you want details of these. Both are cheap and look complete; the San Jose one was from a 1965 Fury and was running well when removed....... that one would be suitable, although it looks like a 2 barrel, but probably still a performance engine. There's even a video of it running in the car, and it does look and sound good.
The older, 318 polysphere A-engine was still used in Canada for 1967 (US vehicles got the LA wedge-head engine that year). And as for carburetion, ALL 318 poly engines were two-barrel-only starting in 1963. But even that engine is a brisk, torquey performer. And as I said in another thread, factory and aftermarket four-barrel manifolds are all over ebay. Foiks like Hot Heads, Egge Machine, and Gary Pavlovich will also be glad to sell you hotter camshafts and other performance parts; Gary is among those who have bored and stroked the 318 poly V8 to over 400 cu. inches while leaving it stock looking outside, so there's another option.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-15, 06:12 PM
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Default Many bottom end parts DO interchange

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin H View Post
The 340 is NOT the same family of engine as the 313 and 318 engines used by Bristol.

The 313 and 318 engines used by Bristol were "A" series engines, with a polyspherical cylinder head chamber. The engines are commonly referred to as "Poly" engines.

Chrysler then moved on to produce the "LA" series engines which had a wedge shaped head chamber. There are few, if any, interchangeable components between a 318 Poly and a 318 "LA" or wedge head engine.

Unfortunately, the "LA" series engine is commonly referred to as the "A" engine which causes much confusion.
Actually, the 318 A series polysphere and later LA wedge-head versions (at least into the early '70s) use the same forged crankshaft, connecting rods, oil pump, water pump, timing gear, and many other bottom-end parts. Distributors interchange as well. Of course, the pistons and pushrods are different. And of course the heads and intake/exhaust manifolds. The blocks themselves are similar and use the same bore and stroke. The A-series poly 318 has a thicker block, however, versus the thin-wall block on the LA 318.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 29-04-16, 03:07 PM
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Default Now for the Carbs??

So the 340 is out and a beautiful 318 is sitting on the floor next to the car.
Does anyone know what number Carter 4 barrel AFB carburetor is the right one for the motor?

Thanks.

And to have wheels while the 408 is having an engine transplant, I have just bought a 1972 411. It arrives on the transporter next week!
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-16, 09:33 PM
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Default Now for the carbs

Sorry, only just seen this request. I believe that the 318 used the Carter 3131S AFB carb.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-16, 10:08 PM
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My feelng has always been that it's perfectly okay to make performance/reliability/practicality upgrades, and Bristols are no exception. Based on sheer horsepower per cubic inch, it's hard to beat Mopar's 340. Chrysler's threw everything they had at that engine, which puts out far more than it's rated horsepower (numbers designed to fool the insurance companies!).

That said, it's awfully nice to open the hood and see the engine that's meant to be there. As other commenters have noted, there are loads of 318s around for dirt-cheap. You can keep the stock forged cranks and con rods, or put in the entire bottom end from a 340. Growing interest in this "semi-hemi" V8 also means growing parts and value--another reason to stick with the A-series Poly.

While the dual-quad manifold from '57 and '58 Plymouth Furys looks nice, it's essentially a single-plane log manifold that turns the relatively thrifty 318 into a gas guzzler. And as someone mentioned, the most-common Weiand aluminum four-pot manifold is also a single-plane that reduces the low-end grunt these mills are known for.

Best option: An original, if heavy, cast-iron dual-plane manifold made from '56 thru '62 (on the US 277, 301, and 303 and Canadian 303/313 versions of this engine) with, say, a modern Edelbrock four-barrel or even a plug-and-play throttle-body EFI setup. And while you can go all the way over 400 CU IN, the best compromise seems to be boring the A engine out to 3.95 inches (like the '59-only 326) and, perhaps, stroking it to roughly 3.58 inches to bring nearly 360 cubic inches. Or simply leave the stock bore and stroke and enjoy a pleasant combination of torque and reasonable fuel economy.
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-16, 10:14 PM
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Earlier versions used the Carter WCFB four barrel rated at roughly 425 cfm or something along those lines; in '60 or '61, they switched to the AFB. Today, for a relatively stock 318, you'll want the Edelbrock 500 cfm; go 600 cfm for a hot cam and other mods, but remember, it's all too easy to over-carburate!

Remember, too, that earlier manifolds designed for the Carter WCFB had a smaller based made for that smaller carb; you'll need an adapter to fit the later AFB or the essentially similar Edelbrock. Strongly suggest going with a manual choke if you choose the Edelbrock; much, much better control with foolproof operation.
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